Feel Good With Your
Canine Companion

GANA-certified Blue Ribbon
Goldendoodle Breeder

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About Us

This business of breeding Goldendoodles is so exciting to us. We had Golden Retrievers for 17 years but realized that we need smaller dogs that might not shed, like our Goldens did, as we age. We are 8 years into Mini Doodles & love their size, playful energy & general good nature.

They are smart, making them very easy to train, and they love to be with people. Both of mine have understood the difference between work and home.

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At work, they greet the clients but keep a low profile. At home, you cannot keep a ball from them. They will find it anywhere and keep it close enough for a passerby to play.

If you are too tired or busy to participate, they will roll it off the sofa or down the steps to retrieve and play nicely by themselves. When we got our first Goldendoodle, we were inexperienced in the breeding world.

Our little Ruxton was so inbred that he was sick from the day we got him, but like so many, we fell in love and could not turn back. We are looking for another puppy for our family & decided to have our girl, Roxie, checked out. Through DNA testing, we found out she is 27% Golden & 73% Poodle. Our health results included tests for over 190 genetic conditions that affect dogs. We continued with OFA certifications for her hips, elbows, heart, and eyes. Roxie is Awesome!

I found out about GANA and was so impressed by their Code of Ethics that I knew this was the organization that I wanted to work with and be represented by.

Bath

Your Goldendoodle should be bathed no more than once per month unless they are exceedingly dirty. Puppies can go even longer between baths, but you may want to wet them and pretend bathing early in life to help get them comfortable with the procedure. If your Goldendoodle gets extra dirty or stinky, more bathing may be required, but sometimes a good rinsing by the outdoor hose can do the trick. Remember to avoid scalding on a hot day. Let the water run long enough to remove all hot water from the hose before turning it on your pooch. Excess bathing is not recommended because it can cause dry, itchy skin.

When bathing your Goldendoodle, pre-brush, inspect ears and eyes, paws and pads and inspect skin for irritation or rashes. Trim their nails, careful to avoid the quick. Rinse coat thoroughly. Since your Goldendoodle has Poodle as part of its DNA, be sure to check for (poodily) eyes. This "goo or crust" can be removed with a wet paper towel or specifically designed eye wipes. Grooming your Goldendoodle should begin as early as possible so it is expected and accepted. Some pups will enjoy their baths while others may only tolerate it. Remember rewards by treats, praise or play will make it a pleasing and memorable experience.

Brush your Goldendoodle often and play with their feet, ears and tail so they become accustomed to it.

Play Time

Puppies need play time as well as plenty of rest. They need to be exposed to different sounds, people, tastes, textures and experiences. Gently touch every inch of your new puppy. Lay your fur baby on its back and gently stroke its belly. Play builds muscle and burns fat. Active puppies are healthy puppies. Play relieves stress and allows aggressive pups to release energy in a productive way by attacking "stuffies" and shaking them into submission. Allowing a shy puppy to win a game of tug-of-war can boost their confidence and distracting a fearful pup during play can also give them confidence. The puppy will love and trust those who play safely with them.

Say NO to People Food

There are foods that your puppy of any age should never ingest. Chocolate, avocado, sugar and unbaked yeast dough are forbidden. Onions, garlic and chives - in any state - powdered, raw, cooked, or dehydrated can kill their red blood cells causing anemia. Also avoid coffee, alcohol, caffeine, coconut and coconut oil. Citrus, nuts, salty foods should not touch their lips. Grapes and raisins, artificial sweeteners found in diet foods can cause liver failure in just a couple of days. Symptoms could include vomiting, lifelessness and coordination issues and the possibility of seizures. Milk and milk-based products such as yogurt and ice cream can cause diarrhea and other digestive problems. Milk products can also cause skin allergies. Fat trimmed from meat, raw or cooked, can cause pancreatitis in dogs. Raw fish, meat and eggs can have bacteria like E. Coli and Salmonella or parasites causing stomach issues or worse. Do not give your canine people medicine unless instructed by your vet. If your dog ingests items that they shouldn't, call ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 888.426.4435