Pups/Litters

Upon approval of application, a $500.00 non-refundable reservation fee is required to hold your puppy. Balance will be due when the puppies are 5 to 6 weeks, at which time you will choose your puppy.
We cannot guarantee gender, color or coat. We believe our first and most important criteria should be placing the right puppy with the right family based on temperament. Gender, color and coat are nice to have on a wish list and we can take them into consideration but if you have a definite desire for certain genders or look, you must have an open time-frame or be willing to wait for another litter if our current litter does not produce what you were looking for. That being said, two of our puppies were very red when we picked them up, however by maturity, they were both almost white. Roxie's DNA suggests her mature weight would be close to 25lbs, but she weighs only 18lbs at 2+years.

Our Goldendoodle puppies are $2800.00. Balance must be paid in full at time of selection and signing of contract. Usually this is between 5 and 7 weeks old. Puppies can go home between 8 and 10 weeks old. We do allow some flexibility when picking up, but any puppy not picked up by 10 weeks will incur a weekly fee of $150.00. This allows us to devote the necessary time to train and socialize that puppy plus additional shots, feed and supplies as needed.

Your pup will be eating PawTree Chicken & Brown Rice kibble when they leave. I will send home a small bag of what they have been eating. However, I recommend that you pre-order from PawTree before picking up your puppy. To place an order, log on to PawTree.comRRD. If you change their food, it will probably upset their system, possibly causing diarrhea and it is very hard to potty train a puppy who is experiencing bowel problems. Feeding 3 times a day until 5 or 6 months, then twice a day will be fine. Start with 1 cup of kibble per day divided by number of meals. I sprinkle a little PawTree PawPairings Superfood Seasonings to create variety and added nutrition. I will send a couple of packets home with you. Watch your puppy’s body to determine if you are feeding them enough or too much.

I will send home a couple pee pads. Place one pad at the exit door and it’s used for “oh, I just couldn’t make it outside.” Take pup out every hour when you are awake, also as soon as your pup eats, drinks, wakes up or leaves crate. I recommend going to bed between 10-11pm. Get up at 2am and then again around 5-6am for the first couple of weeks. If your puppy is soiling its’ crate, limit the space. Make it smaller by placing a barricade in it. They do not want to pee where they sleep. We have been using ChunHee potty bells (available from Amazon through my website). Touch their nose on the bells each time you exit door to potty. I also say “go potty”.

Choose a potty spot where you will want your puppy to “go potty”. After your puppy goes potty, reward with praise and possibly a small treat immediately. I always tell mine "go potty" & "BACK", because their bathroom area is at the back of our yard. Then I do not have to worry about my grandchildren stepping in "pooh" & I do not have to poop scoop before I can play frisbee or corn hole.

If you change their food, it will probably upset their system, possibly causing diarrhea and it is very hard to potty train a puppy who is experiencing bowel problems. Feeding starts at 3 times a day, but by 6 months, diminishes to twice a day. Start with 1 cup of kibble per day divided by number of meals. I open a capsule of PawTree Gastro Pro Plus and sprinkle this for “gut” health and a little PawTree PawPairings Superfood Seasonings over food for healthful advantage and to create variety.

You will need a small crate to begin with or at least a barricade to make it seem small. I crate whenever I am not at home, and at night. If you are thinking about not crating at all, I recommend to do it for at least 6 months. You never know in the future if you will need to board or for some reason the dog needs to be contained. By crating in the beginning it gets them used to it and it keeps your puppy safe. Both of you will be happy to see each other when you get home. They may cry for a couple of days. Placing the crate in a different part of the house where you cannot hear them as much will help you get through it. Use a command like “go sleep” and maybe place a small stuffed toy with your puppy. If your puppy continues to soil it's crate, REMOVE EVERYTHING  soft & absorbent.

Remember to place your pup in the crate when you can’t watch it every moment. It is much easier to teach them not to pee in the house then it is to break them after they have started doing it.

Puppies sleep between 15-20 hours a day, and although they’re often likely just to drop in their tracks, bring you pup to its’ crate when ready for a nap and at bedtime. Crates are not “doggie jail.” They are more like your teenager’s bedroom. Dogs prefer the security and safety of a den, and this crate will become a safe space. I leave crate doors open all the time and most of the time when we are not interacting, my pups can be found lounging in their crate.

It is important to realize that dogs need boundaries. Start enforcing these from the moment you come home. Do not allow your puppy to break the rules “just this once” or it may confuse your pup when it's not allowed to do the same thing the next time. From the first day, your new puppy should sleep in the spot that has been designated for him. He should be kept off of pieces of furniture and out of areas of the house where he won’t be allowed later on in life. As difficult as it may be to resist puppy dog eyes or whimpers, your pup will be more secure later on if you stick to the rules from the beginning. My pups are not allowed in my kitchen and never have been, for fear of spilling something hot or dropping something sharp or just tripping over them.

Your pup will take time to adjust to being alone and not having siblings to share the pen with. Keep at it. No free reign of the house until potty training seems successful, at least a couple of months. If you can’t contain them, leash them to your belt loop and watch for signs like sniffing or squatting. This also protects them from chewing electric cords, furniture or other destructive activity that could also be hazardous.

We have already introduced your puppy to a collar and leash. Heeling should be done on your left side beside your foot. If they pull on the leash, stop and stand perfectly still, say nothing. When they release their pull, you can resume walking, starting off with your left foot. If they pull, stop & say nothing again. They will soon realize that if they walk nicely, they can continue to walk. Reward good behavior with a very small treat. I like to use the treat pouch. Give command or wait for sit and give treat. The more you walk, the more they learn. Remember hips are not yet developed. Walk on grass whenever possible during their first 6 months. No hiking miles or mountains until they are adults. Short walks only and only after all shots have been completed. Parvo is a deadly puppy disease that can be prevented by keeping your puppy safely away from other dogs and where other dogs "hang out or potty" until all vaccinations are complete! 

Keep water available during the day, unless crated. While pups are young, take it away several hours before crating for the night. When puppies are house & crate trained, water can be available all of the time.

We will have already introduced your pup to people outside of our home, children, other dogs, sounds, smells and textures. After all shots are complete, you can take your pup to a puppy kindergarten training class. This can be a great experience for you and the pup. Take the pup to friend’s houses for a visit. Try parks and big box stores. Get them used to going places and being well behaved. The first 6 months are critical to socializing. Introduce to more young children and lots of new sounds. The more you socialize, the more relaxed they become around strange and new things. Just be aware of diseases passed on by other dogs directly or indirectly. Complete all shots!

Start enforcing rules. Although it may seem too early to you, your pup needs to learn the house rules from the very beginning. The more structured and consistent its' day is, the better adjusted and happier your pup will be. Whether it’s chewing or any other behavior you do not want to encourage, use gentle redirection. Yelling or punishing your pup will only frighten and confuse it. Remember that your pup is only just starting to learn what is expected. Praising good behavior and deflecting (redirecting) unacceptable behavior is an effective way of help your puppy to learn.

At 5 months old, you will want to make an appt to spay or neuter your pup, in the near future. Talk with your vet about the best time. Be sure the vet (or you) send me a spay/neuter certificate including the correct microchip number.

It is very important to remember that your pup is like an infant when they come home. You are the parent. What you teach them is what they know. The first couple of days are traumatizing to a new pup. They do not have siblings to comfort them. They may cry when left alone. It may take 5 to 10 minutes for them to quiet. By day 4-5 they should be adjusting. In a few months, they will go and lay in their crate when the door is left open. It becomes a safe and comfortable space.

Pick up day is a big deal for puppy and family! It is exciting and overwhelming. Here is some info you need to know.

You and your new puppy need to take some time to get to know each other. As tempting as it may be to invite everyone you know over to meet your adorable new addition, it may be better to wait a few days. That way, your puppy has a chance to bond with you and your family and to grow comfortable in it's new home.

You’ve already prepared a puppy-proof area of your house, right? This is where you will begin. Do not allow your puppy loose to explore too much of the house at one time. Let your pup explore a small, designated area at a time. Possibly where food, water and crate are located. Allow time to adjust before introducing your puppy to the rest of the house, one room at a time, skipping the areas you’ve decided are off-limits. My dogs do not enter my kitchen. I am afraid of spilling something hot, dropping something sharp or just tripping over them.

Dogs thrive on consistency. Whenever possible, leave and return home, feed, walk, and play with your puppy at approximately the same time each day. Establishing a routine, from the beginning, will help your puppy feel safe and secure, reducing the chances of developing anxiety.

When you pick up your microchipped puppy, you will get a 2-year health warranty, pedigree of your dog's ancestors and proof of testing on both parents. You will also receive a collar and leash and a quart bag of PawTree food. Click on https://pawtree.com/RRD to place an order BEFORE picking up your puppy. I will also give you a couple of PawPairings seasoning sample packets (just sprinkle a very little – not the whole packet on their kibble), a blanket with “family” scent, up-to-date shots, and a folder with all vet paperwork.

If you change their food, it will probably upset their system, possibly causing diarrhea. It is very hard to potty train a puppy who is experiencing bowel problems. Feeding begins with 3 times a day, but by 6 months, diminishes to twice a day. Start with 1 cup of kibble per day, divided by number of meals. I open a capsule of PawTree Gastro Pro Plus and sprinkle this for “gut” health and a very little PawTree PawPairings Superfood Seasonings over kibble for healthful advantage and to create variety.

Some other healthful suggestions from PawTree
Salmon Oil - for brain, skin, and coat health
Gastro Pro Plus - pre and probiotics and digestive enzymes for immune health
PawPairings - vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and variety

Setting up a regular scheduled delivery (EZ ship) with 3 or more qualifying items https://pawtree.com/RRD (food does not qualify but can be shipped free when added to your EZ ship order) will give you free shipping on the entire order. Items and shipping frequency can be changed at any time. I recommend the puppy starter kits (there are two different ones). They contain the Chicken kibble but, raising puppies on a mixture or variety of kibble helps them to avoid food allergies as adults.

Your pup will have been vetted, dewormed 3 times and given up-to-date shots before they go home with you. My vet recommends the next dose of deworming at 10 weeks and final dose at 14 weeks along with vaccines to include a minimum of rabies and distemper. You may need a booster at 16-17 because the first shot does not contain Lepto. Ask your vet what they recommend & if Lyme and Kennel Cough should be added. I expect your vet will also give your puppy their first dose of Revolution for flea and heartworm prevention. Be sure to keep up with Heartworm Prevention. It is critical! A small mosquito bite can transfer this deadly parasite to your furry friend. Your vet might switch you to another product. I prefer Revolution because it is safe even for puppies, however Revolution does not guard against ticks. It does guard against parasites and ear mites. My second choice at 6 months old is Bravecto and Heartguard. Talk with your vet about what is best for your new puppy.

Your pup has been microchipped. I am a lifetime alternate. You can add and remove many other alternates. I can register it for a lifetime with AKC Reunite. They also offer Lifetime Poison Helpline for only $15.00. I can register your pup for this too. If at any point your pup needs to be rehomed, it’s important to notify me first. I have first right of refusal. A microchip is only registered to your puppy. I also ask if you move or change info to notify me so I can update your file. 

I have notified you about Trupanion pet insurance. If you activated this benefit before you picked up your pup, it is covered for 30 days for accidental issues & illness (not well checks or shots). There is a $250.00 deductible. You can decide if you wish to continue or cancel. If your pup ingests something and requires surgery, it will run you around $2,000. Insurance can save you a ton of money!

Your pup will have been groomed at least once and nails trimmed about 6 to 8 times to get them used to it. Get a good daily brush. A slicker brush pulls out undercoat if pup is shedding or changing coat from puppy to adult. Brush the coat out in sections. Length is a personal choice. If your pup will be swimming or hiking through the woods, keep them groomed shorter. If you do not brush at least 3 times a week, then they will matt and you may need to groom them shorter. A matted puppy is a puppy in PAIN. If your puppy is matted, expect a groomer to charge more and the possibility of having your pup shaved very short every time. I groom my own dogs. I prefer the Wahl KM10 and groom at least every 4 to 8 weeks. Trim nails at least once a month. Be gentle. Don’t cut the “quick”. Some dogs are more comfortable having their nails filed with a doggy file. NEVER use an electric Dremel tool!

I will have had all of Roxie's pups DNA tested. If you are interested, you can purchase your pup's DNA tests from R&RD for $100.00 or send for your own testing to Embark for $130.00

I am always available to answer questions. Send me an email or give me a call. If at any point your puppy is not working out for you or if you have life changes that make it impossible for you to keep your pup, please notify me. I will help you. I have people contact me all the time who are looking for an adult. I would have no problem placing a dog that just didn’t work out or couldn’t be kept.

Some Helpful Information

Submit DNA test to EMBARK for $130.00 or save $30.00 and purchase your test results from me, your breeder for $100.00.

The Goldendoodle Handbook

The Essential Guide For New & Prospective Goldendoodle Owners (Canine Handbooks) by Linda Whitwam - available on Amazon

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